Culture & Heritage

Projects in this theme build relationships between research groups in the arts and humanities and community groups and organisations exploring their local and regional cultures and heritage.
 

FLEX (Flexible Dwellings for Extended Living)

Principal Investigator: Prof Ann Light
From 2012 to 2013

The FLEX (Flexible Dwellings for Extended Living) project sought to address a challenge of 21st century wellbeing – an increasing older population that wants to age ‘at home’, facing the social isolation that accompanies the loss of traditional meeting places like pubs, pension queues, community centres and the High Street. Read more

Heritage Legacies

Principal Investigator: Dr Jo Vergunst; University of Aberdeen
From 2014 to 2015

Heritage Legacies seeks to explore the legacies – the outcomes, benefits, and assets – created by heritage research funded by the AHRC’s Connected Communities programme. We are working with a range of Connected Communities projects to understand legacies and propose future directions for community–university partnerships in this field. Read more

Tailored trades: clothes, labour and professional communities (1880-1939)

Principal Investigator: Dr Vike Plock (University of Exeter)
From 2012 to 2014

The Industrial Revolution fundamentally changed the commercial, professional and social landscape of the modern world. While factory and clerical workers, sales assistants, parlour maids, trade unionists and other members of a newly established workforce faced changing working environments, a radical transformation of clothes paralleled this revolution in trades and industries. New vocations required new vestments. Read more

Researching community heritage

Principal Investigator: Bob Johnston (University of Sheffield)
From 2013 to 2014

Researching Community Heritage brings together academics and community partners interested in researching local heritage. The team consists of a network of researchers with expertise in a wide range of subjects from landscape archaeology to storytelling and cultural history. Read more

Whose Remembrance? A scoping study of the available research on ex-colonial communities and the experience of two world wars

Principal Investigator: Suzanne Bardgett, Imperial War Museums
2012

Whose Remembrance? sought to investigate the state of research into the experiences of the peoples of Britain’s former empire in the two world wars, and the understanding and availability of this research to audiences and communities today. The project was carried out by the IWM Research team in consultation with an advisory group of academics and specialists. Read more

Cymunedau cysylltiedig 2: researching the industrial and post-industrial heritage of the Swansea valley

Principal Investigator: Professor Huw Bowen (Swansea University)
From 2013 to 2014

This multi-partner, bi-lingual community heritage project is focused on the history of industrial and post industrial communities in the Swansea Valley. Read more

Dig Where We Stand: Developing and Sustaining Community Heritage

Principal Investigator: Dr Andrew Flinn

Drawing inspiration from the History Workshop slogan “Dig Where You Stand”, the project proceeded from the belief that a community’s sense of itself and place rests on an understanding of its past. Read more

Gateways to the First World War

Principal Investigator: Professor Mark Connelly
From 2014 to 2016

Gateways to the First World War is one of five AHRC-funded public engagement centres established to bring together academics and members of the public in commemorating the centenary of the First World War. Read more

Georgian Glasgow

Principal Investigator: Professor Murray Pittock (University of Glasgow)
From 2012 to 2015

This project examines the history of Glasgow in the Georgian era (1700-1840) via literature, art, and objects from the period. The project deals with key themes and authors alongside new theories of cultural memory. In 2014 a major exhibition (‘How Glasgow Flourished – 1700-1840′) will take place in Kelvingrove Museum. Read more

Building and Enriching Shared Heritages

Principal Investigator: Prof Roey Sweet, University of Leicester
From 2013 to 2014

‘Building and enriching shared heritages’ consolidated and built upon existing relationships between the University and the wider community by exchanging knowledge in the skills needed to conduct historical research. Read more