Culture & Heritage

Projects in this theme build relationships between research groups in the arts and humanities and community groups and organisations exploring their local and regional cultures and heritage.
 

Know Your Bristol On The Move

Principal Investigator: Professor Robert Bickers
2012

‘Know Your Bristol on the Move’ is a collaborative project between the University of Bristol, Bristol City Council and eight Bristol community groups. We conceive of ‘Bristol communities’ broadly as groupings of Bristol residents that come together around a place, interest, political claim or shared life experience. Read more

Crowd-sourcing Scoping Study

Principal Investigator: Dr Mark Hedges
2012

This project sought to establish a credible definition for, and the current state of the art of, crowd-sourcing in the humanities. Read more

Meanwhile use as performance: Securing social value from vacant space

Principal Investigator: Andy Dearden (Sheffield Hallam University)
From 2012 to 2013

’Meanwhile’ use of temporarily vacant spaces is applied by many organisations to access cheap space during the recession. This project explored how community-based organisations could make the most effective use of these opportunities. We brought together community development practitioners, community groups, landlords, local authority representatives and ‘meanwhile’ brokers to explore issues. Read more

Trade and traffic on the River Trent and associated waterways 1850-1970

Principal Investigator: Dr Richard Gaunt (Nottingham University)
From 2013 to 2014

The University of Nottingham is working with Newark Heritage Barge Charitable Incorporated Organisation (which is working to fit out a floating barge as a living museum) on a history of the river Trent from the coming of the railway in the mid-nineteenth century to the recent past. Read more

Cultural intermediation: connecting communities in the creative urban economy

Principal Investigator: Dr Phil Jones (University of Birmingham)
From 2012 to 2016

Cultural intermediation is a set of processes that seek to get people involved in activities within the creative and cultural economy. This can encompass a wide range of activities from poetry coaching through training people with new IT skills, to outreach activities by a local museum. Read more

Untold stories of volunteering: a cultural animation project

Principal Investigator: Professor Mihaela Kelemen (Keele University)
From 2013 to 2014

The project aims to give voice to ‘untold stories of volunteering’ by employing a cultural animation methodology to ensure that such stories are co-designed and co- produced with and by volunteers and other interested stakeholders. Read more

Cambridge Community Heritage

Principal Investigator: Dr Carenza Lewis, University of Cambridge
From 2012 to 2013

In Cambridge Community Heritage (CCH) project (2012-13), ten University of Cambridge researchers in Archaeology, History, Heritage and Public Engagement collaborated in research with 37 community groups in eastern England. Read more

Memories of ‘Mr Seel’s Garden’: Engaging with historic and future food systems in Liverpool

Principal Investigator: Dr Michelle Bastian
From 2012 to 2013

On the outer edges of Liverpool ONE, a 42 acre regeneration area of the city centre, there is a Tesco Superstore. Read more

Bridging the Gap between Academic Theory and Community Relevance: Fresh Insights from American Pragmatism

Principal Investigator: Professor Mihaela Kelemen, Keele University
From 2013 to 2014

‘Bridging the Gap’ focuses on what is considered ‘actionable’ knowledge by communities and what makes knowledge relevant, useful and/or practical at their end. The four AHRC projects involved in this collaborative grant application share the view that academic theories are not ends in themselves; rather that they must serve the needs of the communities studied. Read more

ACCORD – Archaeology Community Co-Production of Research Data

Principal Investigator: Dr Stuart Jeffrey, Glasgow School of Art
From 2013 to 2015

The ACCORD project seeks to examine the opportunities and implications of digital visualisation technologies for community engagement and research through the co-creation of 3D models of heritage places. Despite their increasing accessibility, techniques such as laser scanning, 3D modelling and 3D printing have remained in the domain of heritage specialists. Read more