Culture & Heritage

Projects in this theme build relationships between research groups in the arts and humanities and community groups and organisations exploring their local and regional cultures and heritage.
 

Cambridge Community Heritage

Principal Investigator: Dr Carenza Lewis, University of Cambridge
From 2012 to 2013

In Cambridge Community Heritage (CCH) project (2012-13), ten University of Cambridge researchers in Archaeology, History, Heritage and Public Engagement collaborated in research with 37 community groups in eastern England. Read more

Memories of ‘Mr Seel’s Garden’: Engaging with historic and future food systems in Liverpool

Principal Investigator: Dr Michelle Bastian
From 2012 to 2013

On the outer edges of Liverpool ONE, a 42 acre regeneration area of the city centre, there is a Tesco Superstore. Read more

Bridging the Gap between Academic Theory and Community Relevance: Fresh Insights from American Pragmatism

Principal Investigator: Professor Mihaela Kelemen, Keele University
From 2013 to 2014

‘Bridging the Gap’ focuses on what is considered ‘actionable’ knowledge by communities and what makes knowledge relevant, useful and/or practical at their end. The four AHRC projects involved in this collaborative grant application share the view that academic theories are not ends in themselves; rather that they must serve the needs of the communities studied. Read more

ACCORD – Archaeology Community Co-Production of Research Data

Principal Investigator: Dr Stuart Jeffrey, Glasgow School of Art
From 2013 to 2015

The ACCORD project seeks to examine the opportunities and implications of digital visualisation technologies for community engagement and research through the co-creation of 3D models of heritage places. Despite their increasing accessibility, techniques such as laser scanning, 3D modelling and 3D printing have remained in the domain of heritage specialists. Read more

GEM (Grown, Edible, Meaningful)

Principal Investigator: Ann Light
From 2013 to 2014

The GEM project invited people to grow edible plants together to inspire reflection on environmental issues across cultures and faiths. Our team of researchers and community organisations wanted to know what different meanings growing food holds across different communities and to learn if this affects feelings towards the environment, ecological issues and other people. Read more

Cultural Planning for Sustainable Communities

Principal Investigator: Graeme Evans
From 2013 to 2014

This 18 month research project aims to use cultural mapping and planning as a way to explain and value the relationship between arts & culture and the environment. Ideas of and behaviour towards the natural environment and ‘ecosystems’ tend to lack a cultural dimension, or include the cultural sector of arts organisations, artists and other ‘hidden’ community culture. Read more

Pararchive: Open Access Community Storytelling and the Digital Archive

Principal Investigator: Simon Popple (University of Leeds)
From 2013 to 2015

Pararchive aims to co-produce a new open digital resource that will allow anyone to search and collect on-line sources and combine them with their own media (film, photographs and other ephemera) to tell their own stories, make new archives, be creative, start new projects and do their own research. Read more

Múin Béarla do na Leanbháin (Teach the Children English): Migration as a Prism for Viewing Ethnolinguistic Vitality in Northern Ireland

Principal Investigator: Professor Karen P. Corrigan
From 2014 to 2015

Research on language in Northern Ireland (NI) focuses on the varieties spoken by the major ethnicities. Their linguistic heritageshave been hotly disputed and scholarship reflects the socio-political conflict of ‘The Troubles’. The Peace Process has ensured greater protection for Irish and Ulster Scots and has also made NI more attractive, resulting in unprecedented immigration. Read more

Global Cotton Connections: East meets West in the Derbyshire Peak District, UK

Principal Investigator: Dr Susanne Seymour, School of Geography, University of Nottingham
From 2014 to 2015

Britain is famous for its ‘Industrial Revolution’ and cotton textiles were a key component of this. Many early mills were located in rural areas where water power could be harnessed. The Derbyshire Peak District, now partly covered by a National Park and containing the Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site, is one key area yet its global connections remain obscured. Read more

Community filmmaking and cultural diversity: Practice, innovation and policy

Principal Investigator: Dr Sarita Malik (Brunel University)
From 2013 to 2014

The research aims to understand better how community filmmaking practices, in culturally diverse contexts, contribute to the wider film ecology and to representation, identity and innovation and how this contribution can be better supported by policy. Read more