Diversity & Dissent

Here our projects explore the operations of inclusion and exclusion, of communities at or beyond the margins, as well as questions about cultures and communities of resistance and social justice.
 

Philosophy of Religion and Religious Communities: Defining Beliefs and Symbols

Principal Investigator: Daniel Whistler (University of Liverpool)
2012

The project consists in a review of the contributions philosophy of religion can make to debates surrounding religious discrimination. The question ‘when is it acceptable to prohibit the use of religious symbols?’ has become an extremely pertinent one for communities of all faiths in the UK. Read more

Connected lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans communities? A scoping study to explore understandings and experiences of ‘community’ among LGBT people

Principal Investigator: Eleanor Formby
2012

This study examined understandings and experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGBT) communities, and assessed implications for health and wellbeing. It was based on a review of existing literature, an online survey (627 respondents), and in-depth interviews and discussion groups with (44) LGBT people. Read more

Living Together: Re-Thinking Social Unity for a Multi-Faith Society

Principal Investigator: Dr Derek Edyvane, University of Leeds
2011

The ‘civic health’ discourse in contemporary politics presupposes an analogy between the lives of communities and the lives of individuals that is often overlooked. This report examines two prominent philosophical conceptions of the life of an individual – the ‘episodic’ and the ‘narrative’ – and considers what they can tell us about the lives of communities. Read more

Cultural Activism in the Community

Principal Investigator: Michael Buser
2012

This scoping study explored literature and debates on cultural activism and communities of place. Cultural activism is defined as a set of creative practices and activities which challenge dominant interpretations and constructions of the world, while presenting alternative socio-political and spatial imaginaries in ways which challenge relationships between art, politics, participation and spectatorship. Read more

Song Lines to Impact and Legacy: Creating Living Knowledge through Working with Social Haunting

Principal Investigator: Geoff Bright
From 2015 to 2017

This project developed from the previous AHRC Connected Communities ECR Development Project, ‘Working with Social Haunting’ and the AHRC 2016 Festival project ‘Opening the ‘Unclosed Space’: Multiplying Ghost Labs as Intergenerational Utopian Practice’. Read more

Historicising and reconnecting rural community: Black presences and the legacies of slavery and colonialism in rural Britain, c.1600-1939

Principal Investigator: Dr Susanne Seymour, School of Geography, University of Nottingham
From 2012 to 2013

The project entitled ‘Historicising and reconnecting rural community: Black presences and the legacies of slavery and colonialism in rural Britain, c.1600-1939’ involved both scoping and outreach activities. It ran from February 2012 to October 2013. Dr Lowri Jones worked with Susanne Seymour on the project. Read more

How should decisions about heritage be made?: Co-designing a research project

Principal Investigator: Dr Helen Graham, University of Leeds
2014

‘How should decisions about heritage be made?’ is an unusual research project because, when we started, we didn’t exactly know what it was about! This is because a team of people from lots of different types of organisations, groups and communities worked together in early 2013 to work together to design the research questions and its methods. Read more

Authority, knowledge and performance in participatory practice

Principal Investigator: Claire Blencowe (University of Warwick)
2012

Collaborators – Stepping Out Theatre Company; Mad Hatters of Bath; Authority Research Network We used an initial literature survey and consultations with mental health performance groups to feed into a week-long residential workshop for eleven academics and community practitioners. Read more

In conversation with…:co-designing with more-than-human communities

Principal Investigator: Dr Michelle Bastian; University of Edinburgh
From 2013 to 2014

The aim of this project is to explore how an expanded account of community – one which recognises the active participation of non-humans – might contribute to our understandings of how research can be co-designed and co-produced. Read more

ACCORD – Archaeology Community Co-Production of Research Data

Principal Investigator: Dr Stuart Jeffrey, Glasgow School of Art
From 2013 to 2015

The ACCORD project seeks to examine the opportunities and implications of digital visualisation technologies for community engagement and research through the co-creation of 3D models of heritage places. Despite their increasing accessibility, techniques such as laser scanning, 3D modelling and 3D printing have remained in the domain of heritage specialists. Read more