Health & Well-being

The theme explores the importance of community connectedness for our health – physical, mental and emotional – and the contribution of community-based activities to improving our well-being.
 

Alcohol and Performing Community: Mapping representations of binge drinking and community health

Principal Investigator: Dr Jane Milling
2011

Public and media concern over excessive episodic public drinking among young people, dubbed binge drinking, has increased since the 2000s (Nicholls 2009; Berridge, Herring, Thom 2009). Read more

Connected lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans communities? A scoping study to explore understandings and experiences of ‘community’ among LGBT people

Principal Investigator: Eleanor Formby
2012

This study examined understandings and experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGBT) communities, and assessed implications for health and wellbeing. It was based on a review of existing literature, an online survey (627 respondents), and in-depth interviews and discussion groups with (44) LGBT people. Read more

Representing Communities: Developing the creative power of people to improve health and well-being

Principal Investigator: Prof Gareth Williams
From 2013 to 2017

The aim of this project is to establish how community representations produced through creative arts practices (e.g. story-telling, performance, visual art) can be used as forms of evidence to inform health-related policy and service development. This study will develop methods for using creative art forms as a mode of communication and knowledge exchange. Read more

Taverns, locals and street corners: cross-chronological studies in community drinking, regulation and public space

Principal Investigator: Dr Fabrizio Nevola (University of Bath)
From 2012 to 2013

This pilot study on tavern culture ranges from early modern Europe to the present day. It investigates whether today’s real and imagined patterns of drinking – people congregating in public spaces at night, sold alcohol and revelling – are recurring practices and representations of drinking and of competing communities. Read more

Dementia and imagination

Principal Investigator: Dr Gill Windle, Bangor University
From 2013 to 2016

The research explores how the vision for dementia supportive communities might benefit from creative activities. Read more

Community hacking

Principal Investigator: Chris Speed (Edinburgh)
From 2010 to 2011

Based in the Edinburgh suburb of Wester Hailes, the team of academics, community organisations and local activists have been exploring the affordances of social media to construct ‘bonds’ and ‘bridges’ between and across existing people and groups. Read more

Volunteer sport coaches as community assets

Principal Investigator: Dr Mark Griffiths (University of Birmingham)
2011

Community-based sport is an extensive social enterprise run, almost in its entirety, by volunteer sports coaches. A number of recent studies have suggested that participation in community sport has the potential to deliver a wide range of individual and social benefits. It is in this context that volunteer sports coaches might be viewed as valuable ‘community assets’. Read more

Ways of knowing: Exploring the different registers, values and subjectivities of collaborative research

Principal Investigator: Helen Graham (University of Leeds)
From 2013 to 2014

We are experimentally exploring the different ‘ways of knowing’ which emerge from collaborative, participatory or action research. Our research team is made of people who have been recently involved in collaborative research but who use different techniques and who come from different contexts and/or disciplinary backgrounds. Read more

Connecting communities through food: the development of community supported agriculture in the UK

Principal Investigator: Professor Neil Ravenscroft
From 2010 to 2011

There is a convergence of the cultural and material worlds occurring in farming, driven by communities making connections between the production and consumption of food. This new civic agriculture is experienced in multiple ways, from small groups of allotment holders, to large groups owning substantial farming businesses and land. Read more

Man Food: Exploring men’s opportunities for ‘becoming an ecological citizen’ through protein-related food practices

Principal Investigator: Emma Roe

Current global trends in meat consumption are unsustainable, with large-scale livestock production carrying significant environmental costs – greenhouse gas emissions, land and water usage, and animal health and welfare concerns. Man Food is a project that brings together community partners with university researchers to explore questions around food and the environment, specifically in relation to men’s consumption practices. Read more