Health & Well-being

The theme explores the importance of community connectedness for our health – physical, mental and emotional – and the contribution of community-based activities to improving our well-being.
 

Múin Béarla do na Leanbháin (Teach the Children English): Migration as a Prism for Viewing Ethnolinguistic Vitality in Northern Ireland

Principal Investigator: Professor Karen P. Corrigan
From 2014 to 2015

Research on language in Northern Ireland (NI) focuses on the varieties spoken by the major ethnicities. Their linguistic heritageshave been hotly disputed and scholarship reflects the socio-political conflict of ‘The Troubles’. The Peace Process has ensured greater protection for Irish and Ulster Scots and has also made NI more attractive, resulting in unprecedented immigration. Read more

Listening to Voices: Creative Disruptions with the Hearing Voices Network

Principal Investigator: Dr Gail McConnell, Queen's University Belfast
From 2015 to 2016

In the field of mental health research, voice-hearers feel the effects of academic language-use in their everyday lives through the hierarchical language of ‘others’ (e.g. ‘researcher’ and ‘researched’) and stigmatising labels. This project seeks to learn how to listen to ‘others’ and to counter oppressive structures of language-use by building a network of expertise in listening. It brings together voice-hearing networks, independent artists and academics to develop a suite of resources for creative listening practices. Read more

Stories to connect with: disadvantaged children creating phygital community objects to share their life-narratives of resilience and transformation

Principal Investigator: Dr Candice Satchwell
From 2015 to 2017

Working with children and young people from Barnardo’s and other participatory groups, we will gather stories about young people’s lives which might otherwise not be heard. First we will train young people to become researchers, and they will ‘collect’ narratives from other young people. Then we will work with well-known children’s authors to make these stories into assemblages of fiction. Read more

Exploring personal communities: A review of volunteering processes

Principal Investigator: Professor Mihaela Kelemen, Keele University
2012

Exploring Personal Communities: A Review of Volunteering Processes investigates the idea that personal communities contribute to the public good by offering ways to transcend commonplace dualisms such as public/private and individual/collective. Read more

Foodscapes

Principal Investigator: Michael Buser, University of the West of England
2013

FOODSCAPES was an AHRC Connected Communities project that explored the use of art as a way of opening up discussion about food, food poverty and sustainable communities. Participants included Knowle West Media Centre, The Matthew Tree Project, the Edible Landscapes Movement, UWE Bristol, University of Southampton, the James Hutton Institute and Paul Hurley (artist-in-residence). Read more

GEM (Grown, Edible, Meaningful)

Principal Investigator: Ann Light
From 2013 to 2014

The GEM project invited people to grow edible plants together to inspire reflection on environmental issues across cultures and faiths. Our team of researchers and community organisations wanted to know what different meanings growing food holds across different communities and to learn if this affects feelings towards the environment, ecological issues and other people. Read more

The Ethno-ornithology World Archive – EWA

Principal Investigator: Dr Andrew G. Gosler, University Research Lecturer in Ornithology & Conservation, Oxford University
From 2013 to 2015

Birds inspire people, their cultures, and their faiths, whilst also acting as important environmental indicators. Many people possess knowledge of birds that is rooted in a cultural, rather than in a scientific, context. This knowledge is largely undocumented, but is no less valid than scientific knowledge. Read more

Writing Our History and Digging Our Past: Phase 2

Principal Investigator: Dr Richard Gaunt (Nottingham University)
2013

In Phase 2 we are working with 14 groups and running a series of collaborative skills workshops ranging from recording oral testimony, using archives and preserving artefacts, to geophysical archaeological surveys. Read more

Writing our history: Digging our past

Principal Investigator: Professor Elizabeth Harvey (University of Nottingham)
2012

Uncovering relics from the past or charting the heritage of a local community can be a painstaking and frustrating process for the amateur historian or archaeologist, often hampered by limited time and funding. Read more

Transmitting musical heritage

Principal Investigator: Dr Kate Pahl (University of Sheffield)
From 2013 to 2014

Music is a cultural product of society, a sonic reflection of ideologies and behaviours – a performative heritage. When musical sound is transferred from player-to-player, or player-to-audience, we question what of this cultural meta-data travels with it, and how. Read more