Methods & Theory

All projects are innovating with new ways of contributing academic and public expertise. This theme brings together the new theories and methods being developed.

Lost Spaces

Principal Investigator: Dr Dai O’Brien (York St John University)
From 2015 to 2016

This project aims to explore the consequences of lost community spaces for the Deaf community in Bristol.  Recently, the Deaf community have lost the Centre for the Deaf, which was the  centre of the community for many years, and the Centre for Deaf Studies in the University of Bristol, which was the birthplace of Dr Paddy Ladd’s Deafhood theory and Read more.

Beyond the Campus: Connecting Knowledge and Creative Practice Communities Across Higher Education and the Creative Economy

Principal Investigator: Dr Roberta Comunian, King’s College London
From 2012 to 2015

The network aimed to create a platform for discussion between academics, practitioners, artists, cultural organisations, business development managers and other university directors, about knowledge connections and collaboration between universities and the creative and cultural sector. Read more.

Researching in Public: Learning and Legacy in the Connected Communities Programme

Principal Investigator: Keri Facer
From 2013 to 2015

This longitudinal research project studies the Connected Communities Programme as a whole. It asks what we can learn from the programme about the implications of community-engaged and interdisciplinary research for participating researchers and collaborators, for the future of universities and for the production of knowledge. Read more.

Listening to Voices: Creative Disruptions with the Hearing Voices Network

Principal Investigator: Dr Gail McConnell, Queen's University Belfast
From 2015 to 2016

In the field of mental health research, voice-hearers feel the effects of academic language-use in their everyday lives through the hierarchical language of ‘others’ (e.g. ‘researcher’ and ‘researched’) and stigmatising labels. This project seeks to learn how to listen to ‘others’ and to counter oppressive structures of language-use by building a network of expertise in listening. It brings together voice-hearing networks, independent artists and academics to develop a suite of resources for creative listening practices. Read more.

Around the Toilet

Principal Investigator: Dr. Jen Slater (Sheffield Hallam University)
From 2015 to 2016

The toilet is often thought to be a mundane space, but for those who lack adequate or accessible toilet provision on a daily basis, toilets become a crucial practical issue which can create and reaffirm feelings of exclusion and regulation. Thinking around toilets and their function as material as well as socio-cultural environments presents an opportunity to consider forms of identity in multi-faceted ways. Read more.

The Hospitality Project

Principal Investigator: Naomi Millner
From 2015 to 2016

The Hospitality Project is an arts-based research collaboration between three universities (Bristol, Manchester, Leeds) and three Bristol-based community partners (Dignity for Asylum-Seekers, the Bristol Hospitality Network, and Barton Hill Walled Garden Project). Read more.

FLEX (Flexible Dwellings for Extended Living)

Principal Investigator: Prof Ann Light
From 2012 to 2013

The FLEX (Flexible Dwellings for Extended Living) project sought to address a challenge of 21st century wellbeing – an increasing older population that wants to age ‘at home’, facing the social isolation that accompanies the loss of traditional meeting places like pubs, pension queues, community centres and the High Street. Read more.

Reinventing Learning Cities

Principal Investigator: Keri Facer
From 2016 to 2017

The Reinventing Learning Cities research project explores the multiple ways in which cities learn through social, material and digital processes. Based at the Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol, it constitutes part of the AHRC Connected Communities Programme.   This project asks what methodologies we can deploy to reimagine and make visible the different learning processes in the city. Read more.

Translation across borders: exploring the use, relevance and impact of academic research in the policy process

Principal Investigator: Stephen Connelly
From 2014 to 2015

The usefulness of academic research to policy making requires academic outputs to be easily taken up by policy makers. Yet mutual frustration persists. Academics often believe their evidence-based findings are ignored, while policy makers often feel that academic outputs are too abstract and/or complex to help in solving their problems. Read more.

Time of the clock and time of the encounter

Principal Investigator: Dr Johan Siebers (University of Central Lancashire)
From 2012 to 2013

This project investigates the difference between the time of the clock and the lived time of experience. We live in a world dominated by the time of the clock, yet many aspects of life have a different rhythm and temporality. The time of community, especially, is very often more complex and differentiated that standardised clock time. Read more.