Methods & Theory

All projects are innovating with new ways of contributing academic and public expertise. This theme brings together the new theories and methods being developed.
 

Homing In : Sensing, Sense-Making and Sustainable Place-Making (an arts and social sciences collaborative network)

Principal Investigator: Professor Karen Henwood (Cardiff University)
From 2013 to 2014

The major societal problems of our time require interconnected, collaborative efforts to creatively and imaginatively address the risks, instabilities, uncertainties and rapid pace of change in human-ecological relationships. Climate scientists warn of the effects of dangerous climate change. Social scientists and policy makers seek alternative strategies capable of promoting better science-public communications, community resilience and social sustainability. Read more

Philosophy of Religion and Religious Communities: Defining Beliefs and Symbols

Principal Investigator: Daniel Whistler (University of Liverpool)
2012

The project consists in a review of the contributions philosophy of religion can make to debates surrounding religious discrimination. The question ‘when is it acceptable to prohibit the use of religious symbols?’ has become an extremely pertinent one for communities of all faiths in the UK. Read more

Music Communities

Principal Investigator: Dr Siobhan McAndrew, University of Manchester
From 2012 to 2013

Social networks are critical for the creation and consumption of music. The ‘Music Communities’ programme investigated the core concepts and tools of social network analysis, and how they apply to the study of music. Read more

Measuring big society

Principal Investigator: Professor Richard Mitchell (University of Glasgow)
From 2010 to 2011

Big Society is a core element of the coalition government’s policy and ideology. It is not easy to define, but in essence a Big Society is one in which citizens and communities take a vastly increased role in managing shaping and delivering public services and the social and physical infrastructure of society. Read more

Unearth Hidden Assets through Community Co-design and Co-production

Principal Investigator: Dr Busayawan Lam, Brunel University
From 2013 to 2014

We believe that each community has many valuable assets, for example people and spaces. However, many assets may not be visible to the majority of community members. This collaborative project works with communities to uncover hidden assets and unlock their potential. Read more

Tackling ethical issues and dilemmas in community-based participatory research: a practical resource

Principal Investigator: Professor Sarah Jane Banks (Durham University)
2012

This project brought together community partners and academics from four previous Connected Communities projects to work on developing ethical guidelines for community-based participatory research (CBPR). After two rounds of consultation, a guide was developed and published by the National Coordinating Centre for Public Engagement in November 2012. Read more

Meanwhile use as performance: Securing social value from vacant space

Principal Investigator: Andy Dearden (Sheffield Hallam University)
From 2012 to 2013

’Meanwhile’ use of temporarily vacant spaces is applied by many organisations to access cheap space during the recession. This project explored how community-based organisations could make the most effective use of these opportunities. We brought together community development practitioners, community groups, landlords, local authority representatives and ‘meanwhile’ brokers to explore issues. Read more

Know Your Place

Principal Investigator: Professor Robert Bickers (University of Bristol)
2012

The University of Bristol, in partnership with Bristol City Council and a number of community groups, hosted a series of free public events about local community heritage. Each event allowed people to explore the local history and culture through the eyes of the community. Read more

Maker-centric: building place-based, co-making communities

Principal Investigator: Fiona Hackney; F.Hackney@wlv.ac.uk
From 2016 to 2018

Maker-Centric is one of a series of participatory arts research projects across the UK that are funded by The Arts and Humanities Research Council’s (AHRC) Connected Communities programme. The project takes a material placed-based approach to engaging communities in speculative co-design. Read more

Connection, participation and empowerment in community-based research: the case of the transition movement.

Principal Investigator: Professor Rachel Pain (Durham University); Centre for Social Justice and Community Action
From 2012 to 2013

The project addressed issues identified by Transition Network through its experience of fielding interest from researchers. It documented experiences of Transition groups and researchers involved in research collaborations, created draft guidelines for Transition research, and initiated a broader project on supporting Transition groups to devise appropriate methods for monitoring and evaluation. Read more