Methods & Theory

All projects are innovating with new ways of contributing academic and public expertise. This theme brings together the new theories and methods being developed.
 

Maker-centric: building place-based, co-making communities

Principal Investigator: Fiona Hackney; F.Hackney@wlv.ac.uk
From 2016 to 2018

Maker-Centric is one of a series of participatory arts research projects across the UK that are funded by The Arts and Humanities Research Council’s (AHRC) Connected Communities programme. The project takes a material placed-based approach to engaging communities in speculative co-design. Read more

How should decisions about heritage be made?: Co-designing a research project

Principal Investigator: Dr Helen Graham, University of Leeds
2014

‘How should decisions about heritage be made?’ is an unusual research project because, when we started, we didn’t exactly know what it was about! This is because a team of people from lots of different types of organisations, groups and communities worked together in early 2013 to work together to design the research questions and its methods. Read more

In conversation with…:co-designing with more-than-human communities

Principal Investigator: Dr Michelle Bastian; University of Edinburgh
From 2013 to 2014

The aim of this project is to explore how an expanded account of community – one which recognises the active participation of non-humans – might contribute to our understandings of how research can be co-designed and co-produced. Read more

Bridging the Gap between Academic Theory and Community Relevance: Fresh Insights from American Pragmatism

Principal Investigator: Professor Mihaela Kelemen, Keele University
From 2013 to 2014

‘Bridging the Gap’ focuses on what is considered ‘actionable’ knowledge by communities and what makes knowledge relevant, useful and/or practical at their end. The four AHRC projects involved in this collaborative grant application share the view that academic theories are not ends in themselves; rather that they must serve the needs of the communities studied. Read more

Memories of ‘Mr Seel’s Garden’: Engaging with historic and future food systems in Liverpool

Principal Investigator: Dr Michelle Bastian
From 2012 to 2013

On the outer edges of Liverpool ONE, a 42 acre regeneration area of the city centre, there is a Tesco Superstore. Read more

Community as micro-sociality and the new localism agenda

Principal Investigator: Professor Valerie Walkerdine
From 2012 to 2013

The Big Society and localism agendas bring to the fore issues of how communities might operate within a time of austerity. This project addresses current concerns by using a theoretical approach to community which understands it as relational activity, the act of communing, which is the small everyday activity which makes up what counts as community. Read more

Networked communities as dynamic co-created learning environments

Principal Investigator: Professor Neil Ravenscroft
2013

Through a series of co-created and facilitated workshops and training programmes, Phase 1 of this project has brought facilitation practice into conversation with academic research methods to create a co-designed multi-method model for organising the generation of data about personal and community histories and associations. Read more

Creative practice as mutual recovery: connecting communities for mental health and well-being

Principal Investigator: Professor Paul Crawford (University of Nottingham)
From 2013 to 2017

When considering the attributes that modern-day healthcare is frequently accused of lacking, it is all too easy to overlook one of the most precious of all: humanity. The nascent discipline of health humanities aims to address this critical shortcoming. Read more

Our Data Ourselves

Principal Investigator: Tobias Blanke
From 2013 to 2015

Our AHRC funded research project: ‘Our Data Ourselves’, will increase our understanding of the nature and role of the data that young people produce when they use social platforms and applications on their smartphones. We have paired with members of Young Rewired State. Read more

ACCORD – Archaeology Community Co-Production of Research Data

Principal Investigator: Dr Stuart Jeffrey, Glasgow School of Art
From 2013 to 2015

The ACCORD project seeks to examine the opportunities and implications of digital visualisation technologies for community engagement and research through the co-creation of 3D models of heritage places. Despite their increasing accessibility, techniques such as laser scanning, 3D modelling and 3D printing have remained in the domain of heritage specialists. Read more