Methods & Theory

All projects are innovating with new ways of contributing academic and public expertise. This theme brings together the new theories and methods being developed.
 

Community? What do you mean? An investigation into how differing understandings of the term ‘community’ shapes care leavers’ move to independence

Principal Investigator: Dr Sarah Goldingay; University of Exeter
2012

We explored the ways in which a performance-led approach to community formation and personal development can inform care-leavers’ move to independence. Using a case study approach, working with two groups of participants: young people leaving care and their support workers in Devon County Council’s Children in Care team (DCCCCS). Read more

Authority, knowledge and performance in participatory practice

Principal Investigator: Claire Blencowe (University of Warwick)
2012

Collaborators – Stepping Out Theatre Company; Mad Hatters of Bath; Authority Research Network We used an initial literature survey and consultations with mental health performance groups to feed into a week-long residential workshop for eleven academics and community practitioners. Read more

The Poetics of the Archive: creative and community engagement with the Bloodaxe Archives

Principal Investigator: Professor Linda Anderson Newcastle University
From 2013 to 2015

The archive of Bloodaxe Books, newly acquired by Newcastle University, is one of the most extensive and significant poetry archives in the world. The challenge is to unlock its meaning and use by seeing it as more than a scholarly resource, accessible through standard search-based catalogue, and to allow more creative, open-ended and playful interactions with it. Read more

And the Doctor said…

Principal Investigator: Mark Webster (Staffordshire University)
From 2012 to 2014

‘And the Doctor Said….’ uses creative writing as a method for exploring people’s experiences of healthcare in north Staffordshire. People took part in workshops at community venues, which were led by writers, playwrights and storytellers. Participants shared stories, reflected upon, and wrote about their healthcare experiences. Read more

How should decisions about heritage be made?: Co-designing a research project

Principal Investigator: Dr Helen Graham, University of Leeds
2014

‘How should decisions about heritage be made?’ is an unusual research project because, when we started, we didn’t exactly know what it was about! This is because a team of people from lots of different types of organisations, groups and communities worked together in early 2013 to work together to design the research questions and its methods. Read more

In conversation with…:co-designing with more-than-human communities

Principal Investigator: Dr Michelle Bastian; University of Edinburgh
From 2013 to 2014

The aim of this project is to explore how an expanded account of community – one which recognises the active participation of non-humans – might contribute to our understandings of how research can be co-designed and co-produced. Read more

Bridging the Gap between Academic Theory and Community Relevance: Fresh Insights from American Pragmatism

Principal Investigator: Professor Mihaela Kelemen, Keele University
From 2013 to 2014

‘Bridging the Gap’ focuses on what is considered ‘actionable’ knowledge by communities and what makes knowledge relevant, useful and/or practical at their end. The four AHRC projects involved in this collaborative grant application share the view that academic theories are not ends in themselves; rather that they must serve the needs of the communities studied. Read more

Memories of ‘Mr Seel’s Garden’: Engaging with historic and future food systems in Liverpool

Principal Investigator: Dr Michelle Bastian
From 2012 to 2013

On the outer edges of Liverpool ONE, a 42 acre regeneration area of the city centre, there is a Tesco Superstore. Read more

Community as micro-sociality and the new localism agenda

Principal Investigator: Professor Valerie Walkerdine
From 2012 to 2013

The Big Society and localism agendas bring to the fore issues of how communities might operate within a time of austerity. This project addresses current concerns by using a theoretical approach to community which understands it as relational activity, the act of communing, which is the small everyday activity which makes up what counts as community. Read more

Networked communities as dynamic co-created learning environments

Principal Investigator: Professor Neil Ravenscroft
2013

Through a series of co-created and facilitated workshops and training programmes, Phase 1 of this project has brought facilitation practice into conversation with academic research methods to create a co-designed multi-method model for organising the generation of data about personal and community histories and associations. Read more