Methods & Theory

All projects are innovating with new ways of contributing academic and public expertise. This theme brings together the new theories and methods being developed.
 

Connection, participation and empowerment in community-based research: the case of the transition movement.

Principal Investigator: Professor Rachel Pain (Durham University); Centre for Social Justice and Community Action
From 2012 to 2013

The project addressed issues identified by Transition Network through its experience of fielding interest from researchers. It documented experiences of Transition groups and researchers involved in research collaborations, created draft guidelines for Transition research, and initiated a broader project on supporting Transition groups to devise appropriate methods for monitoring and evaluation. Read more

Memories of ‘Mr Seel’s Garden’: Engaging with historic and future food systems in Liverpool

Principal Investigator: Dr Michelle Bastian
From 2012 to 2013

On the outer edges of Liverpool ONE, a 42 acre regeneration area of the city centre, there is a Tesco Superstore. Read more

Community as micro-sociality and the new localism agenda

Principal Investigator: Professor Valerie Walkerdine
From 2012 to 2013

The Big Society and localism agendas bring to the fore issues of how communities might operate within a time of austerity. This project addresses current concerns by using a theoretical approach to community which understands it as relational activity, the act of communing, which is the small everyday activity which makes up what counts as community. Read more

Networked communities as dynamic co-created learning environments

Principal Investigator: Professor Neil Ravenscroft
2013

Through a series of co-created and facilitated workshops and training programmes, Phase 1 of this project has brought facilitation practice into conversation with academic research methods to create a co-designed multi-method model for organising the generation of data about personal and community histories and associations. Read more

Creative practice as mutual recovery: connecting communities for mental health and well-being

Principal Investigator: Professor Paul Crawford (University of Nottingham)
From 2013 to 2017

When considering the attributes that modern-day healthcare is frequently accused of lacking, it is all too easy to overlook one of the most precious of all: humanity. The nascent discipline of health humanities aims to address this critical shortcoming. Read more

Our Data Ourselves

Principal Investigator: Tobias Blanke
From 2013 to 2015

Our AHRC funded research project: ‘Our Data Ourselves’, will increase our understanding of the nature and role of the data that young people produce when they use social platforms and applications on their smartphones. We have paired with members of Young Rewired State. Read more

ACCORD – Archaeology Community Co-Production of Research Data

Principal Investigator: Dr Stuart Jeffrey, Glasgow School of Art
From 2013 to 2015

The ACCORD project seeks to examine the opportunities and implications of digital visualisation technologies for community engagement and research through the co-creation of 3D models of heritage places. Despite their increasing accessibility, techniques such as laser scanning, 3D modelling and 3D printing have remained in the domain of heritage specialists. Read more

Performing Abergavenny: creating a connected community beyond divisions of class, locality and history

Principal Investigator: Prof Valerie Walkerdine, Cardiff University
From 2013 to 2014

This project built upon Walkerdine et al’s research in Abergavenny for the Connected Communities Programme, ‘Community as micro-sociality’ (2012-13) which discovered that Abergavenny as a community is geographically disconnected along north/south fault lines, historically related to class and dislocation, and Mackey et al’s project ‘Challenging concepts of ‘liquid’ place through performance practices in community contexts’ (2011-14). Read more

Co-Designing Asset Mapping: Comparative Approaches

Principal Investigator: Dr Giota Alevizou
From 2014 to 2015

Co-Designing Asset Mapping: Comparative Approaches is a project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, February 2014 – April 2015. The project has aimed to explore how academics, the public sector, civil society and grass roots movements can work to address needs and cultivate capacities in communities of place and interest. Read more

Evaluating the Legacy of Animative and Iterative Connected Communities Projects: A Three Dimensional Model of Change

Principal Investigator: Professor Mihaela Kelemen
From 2014 to 2015

This project explores ways of evaluating and enhancing the legacy of the Connected Communities (hereafter CC) programme by investigating and reflecting on the impacts that four projects funded within this programme have had in both in the communities with whom they were conducted and can have in new community settings, both in the UK and beyond. Read more