Projects

There are over 280 individual Connected Communities projects. Further information can be found below where you can access pages for each project. We have grouped the projects around themed clusters to help with navigation or use the text box to search for key words.

Enfield exchange

Principal Investigator: Dr Tilly Blyth, National Museum of Science and Industry
From 2012 to 2013

One of the many objects in the Science Museum’s collections is a manual telephone switchboard from the Enfield telephone exchange. It was collected by the Science Museum in 1961, because it was the last of its kind to be taken out of service in the Greater London area. Read more

Heritage Legacies

Principal Investigator: Dr Jo Vergunst; University of Aberdeen
From 2014 to 2015

Heritage Legacies seeks to explore the legacies – the outcomes, benefits, and assets – created by heritage research funded by the AHRC’s Connected Communities programme. We are working with a range of Connected Communities projects to understand legacies and propose future directions for community–university partnerships in this field. Read more

Connectivity and conflict in periods of austerity: What do we know about the middle class political activism and its effects on public services?

Principal Investigator: Annette Hastings (Glasgow University)
2011

Our project was a scoping review of middle class community activism – research evidence of the taken-for-granted fact that the middle classes shout louder and get more. Our review identified four causal mechanisms that explain how and why the middle classes benefit disproportionately from the state as individuals and as community groups of activists. Read more

Gateways to the First World War

Principal Investigator: Professor Mark Connelly
From 2014 to 2016

Gateways to the First World War is one of five AHRC-funded public engagement centres established to bring together academics and members of the public in commemorating the centenary of the First World War. Read more

Building and Enriching Shared Heritages

Principal Investigator: Prof Roey Sweet, University of Leicester
From 2013 to 2014

‘Building and enriching shared heritages’ consolidated and built upon existing relationships between the University and the wider community by exchanging knowledge in the skills needed to conduct historical research. Read more

Castleford Heritage Project

Principal Investigator: Professor David Waddington, Sheffield Hallam University
2012

Sheffield Hallam University worked alongside the charitable Castleford Heritage Trust with the intention of helping loval groups to develop bids to the Heritage Lottery Fund to enable them to investigate and portray key aspects of their local culture and heritage. Read more

Bridging Environmental Values

Principal Investigator: Steve Cinderby
From 2013 to 2014

Our project looked at: What behaviour that benefits the environment means to people? How they defined it?… and How their environmental actions differed between the places they went and within the groups they mixed with? Read more

Mental Health and Learning Disabilities: Heritage and Stigma

Principal Investigator: Dr Rob Ellis (University of Huddersfield)
From 2013 to 2014

The Heritage and Stigma project is based at the University of Huddersfield and is designed to link academic understanding of the histories of mental ill health and learning disability with areas of current practice. Read more

Leapfrog – trans­form­ing pub­lic sec­tor con­sul­ta­tion by design

Principal Investigator: Dr Leon Cruickshank, Lancaster University
From 2015 to 2017

The Leapfrog project will be a close col­lab­o­ra­tion with pub­lic sec­tor and com­mu­nity part­ners to design and eval­u­ate new creative approaches to consultation. Read more

Digital Building Heritage: Phase III

Principal Investigator: Dr Douglas Cawthorne
From 2014 to 2015

Community heritage and archaeology projects are often focused on ‘doing’, on the processes of archaeology and the collection of data, but often with limited attention paid to the wider interpretation and then dissemination of their results to varied audiences within their communities and beyond. Read more