Projects

There are over 280 individual Connected Communities projects. Further information can be found below where you can access pages for each project. We have grouped the projects around themed clusters to help with navigation or use the text box to search for key words.

Networking communities: mobility, nationalism and the historical geographies of connective infrastructures

Principal Investigator: Dr Peter Merriman, Aberystwyth University
2012

This project provides a synthetic review of how transport infrastructures and mobility practices have been seen to help and hinder the cohesion of local, regional, national and trans-national communities in different geographical, historical and cultural contexts. The main research review is in four sections, covering ‘Infrastructures, technologies, materialities’, ‘mobile practices’, ‘scales’, and ‘politics’. Read more

Dig Where We Stand: Developing and Sustaining Community Heritage

Principal Investigator: Dr Andrew Flinn

Drawing inspiration from the History Workshop slogan “Dig Where You Stand”, the project proceeded from the belief that a community’s sense of itself and place rests on an understanding of its past. Read more

The meaning and role of community cinema in rural Norfolk

Principal Investigator: Dr Mark Rimmer, (University of East Anglia)
From 2012 to 2015

This project seeks to explore the meanings and roles of rural community cinema projects in Norfolk, as these are understood by members of rural communities. The project began in September 2012. The project will engage with questions about the social experience of attendance at rural cinema screening events. Read more

Cymunedau cysylltiedig 2: researching the industrial and post-industrial heritage of the Swansea valley

Principal Investigator: Professor Huw Bowen (Swansea University)
From 2013 to 2014

This multi-partner, bi-lingual community heritage project is focused on the history of industrial and post industrial communities in the Swansea Valley. Read more

Whose Remembrance? A scoping study of the available research on ex-colonial communities and the experience of two world wars

Principal Investigator: Suzanne Bardgett, Imperial War Museums
2012

Whose Remembrance? sought to investigate the state of research into the experiences of the peoples of Britain’s former empire in the two world wars, and the understanding and availability of this research to audiences and communities today. The project was carried out by the IWM Research team in consultation with an advisory group of academics and specialists. Read more

The age of we

Principal Investigator: Dr Tom Wakeford (University of Edinburgh)
To 2014

Our culture is increasingly moving towards an ethos of participation. Whether in government, which promotes co-production, social research that increasingly funded to undertake collaborative inquiry, medicine in which patients are increasingly recognised as experts or the arts, where citizen creativity is being scaled up through digital technologies, there are rapid changes underway. Read more

Conceptualisations and meanings of “community”: the theory and operationalisation of a contested concept

Principal Investigator: Professor Graham Crow (University of Southampton)
2011

The project explored the many different ways that community relationships have been researched, focusing in particular on the range of research methods used by community researchers whose findings have been published since 2000. Read more

Leeds stories of the Great War

Principal Investigator: Professor Alison Fell (University of Leeds)
From 2013 to 2014

Leeds Stories of the Great War is a project run by the University of Leeds. It is about investigating the experiences of people who were living in Leeds during the First World War. This is one part of a bigger project called Legacies of War which is about commemorating the centenary of the First World War. Read more

Time of the clock and time of the encounter

Principal Investigator: Dr Johan Siebers (University of Central Lancashire)
From 2012 to 2013

This project investigates the difference between the time of the clock and the lived time of experience. We live in a world dominated by the time of the clock, yet many aspects of life have a different rhythm and temporality. The time of community, especially, is very often more complex and differentiated that standardised clock time. Read more

Community Hacking and other projects

Principal Investigator: Prof. Chris Speed

Community Hacking covers a series of three small AHRC Connected Communities grants that has involved working closely with partners and residents across Wester Hailes in Edinburgh. The three projects (Community web2.0:Creative Control through Hacking, Ladders to the Cloud, and Communities within spaces of flows) explore the design and development of physical and virtual networks. Read more