Projects: Community

There are over 280 individual Connected Communities projects. Further information can be found below where you can access pages for each project. We have grouped the projects around themed clusters to help with navigation or use the text box to search for key words.

Everyday Lives in War: experience and memory of the First World War

Principal Investigator: Sarah Lloyd
From 2014 to 2016

The Everyday Lives in War centre is one of five First World War engagement centres funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. Read more

Taking Yourselves Seriously

Principal Investigator: Kate Pahl
From 2015 to 2018

  Taking Yourself Seriously is a year long project that aims to create a set of co-produced resources that are connected with arts methodologies with a particular focus on research in the voluntary and community sector. Read more

Researching community heritage

Principal Investigator: Bob Johnston (University of Sheffield)
From 2013 to 2014

Researching Community Heritage brings together academics and community partners interested in researching local heritage. The team consists of a network of researchers with expertise in a wide range of subjects from landscape archaeology to storytelling and cultural history. Read more

The meaning and role of community cinema in rural Norfolk

Principal Investigator: Dr Mark Rimmer, (University of East Anglia)
From 2012 to 2015

This project seeks to explore the meanings and roles of rural community cinema projects in Norfolk, as these are understood by members of rural communities. The project began in September 2012. The project will engage with questions about the social experience of attendance at rural cinema screening events. Read more

Imagine: Connecting Communities Through Research

Principal Investigator: Professor Kate Pahl (University of Sheffield)

The Imagine Project Working in partnership with local communities, we are exploring the social, historical, cultural and democratic context of civic engagement to imagine better futures and make them happen.   This five-year project, running from 2013 – 2017, brings together a range of different research projects working together across universities and communities. Read more

Collective Worship in Schools: An Evaluation of Law and Policy in the United Kingdom

Principal Investigator: Dr Alison Mawhnney Bangor University
From 2014 to 2015

The majority of schools in the UK are required by law to organise acts of collective worship (England, Northern Ireland, Wales) or religious observance (Scotland) for their pupils. Read more

Conceptualisations and meanings of “community”: the theory and operationalisation of a contested concept

Principal Investigator: Professor Graham Crow (University of Southampton)
2011

The project explored the many different ways that community relationships have been researched, focusing in particular on the range of research methods used by community researchers whose findings have been published since 2000. Read more

Connectivity and conflict in periods of austerity: What do we know about the middle class political activism and its effects on public services?

Principal Investigator: Annette Hastings (Glasgow University)
2011

Our project was a scoping review of middle class community activism – research evidence of the taken-for-granted fact that the middle classes shout louder and get more. Our review identified four causal mechanisms that explain how and why the middle classes benefit disproportionately from the state as individuals and as community groups of activists. Read more

Community hacking

Principal Investigator: Chris Speed (Edinburgh)
From 2010 to 2011

Based in the Edinburgh suburb of Wester Hailes, the team of academics, community organisations and local activists have been exploring the affordances of social media to construct ‘bonds’ and ‘bridges’ between and across existing people and groups. Read more

The social world of Nottingham’s historic green spaces: A community history project

Principal Investigator: Professor John Beckett, University of Nottingham
From 2013 to 2014

Working with Friends Groups, Local History Groups and other volunteers, the project is investigating the development of Nottingham’s Arboretum, Forest Recreation Ground, Church and General Cemeteries, several public walks and other green spaces created following the 1845 Enclosure Act. Read more