Projects: Archaeology

There are over 280 individual Connected Communities projects. Further information can be found below where you can access pages for each project. We have grouped the projects around themed clusters to help with navigation or use the text box to search for key words.

Digital Building Heritage: Phase III

Principal Investigator: Dr Douglas Cawthorne
From 2014 to 2015

Community heritage and archaeology projects are often focused on ‘doing’, on the processes of archaeology and the collection of data, but often with limited attention paid to the wider interpretation and then dissemination of their results to varied audiences within their communities and beyond. Read more

Linking communities to historic environments

Principal Investigator: Dr Alex Hale (Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland)
2011

The project aimed to bring together experts and practitioners to share experiences from both ends of the engagement spectrum. On the one end of the spectrum you have the ‘experts’ from national and regional organisations and on the other, the community participants who want to get involved. The project was to bring together both parties in a workshop format. Read more

Crowd- and Community-Fuelled Archaeological Research

Principal Investigator: Andrew Bevan
From 2013 to 2014

This project develops a web platform called MicroPasts where full-time academic researchers, volunteer archaeological and historical societies and other interested members of the public can collaborate together. It is a place where enthusiasts of any background can not only create high-quality research data together about our human history, but also collaboratively design and fund entirely new research projects. Read more

Cambridge Community Heritage

Principal Investigator: Dr Carenza Lewis, University of Cambridge
From 2012 to 2013

In Cambridge Community Heritage (CCH) project (2012-13), ten University of Cambridge researchers in Archaeology, History, Heritage and Public Engagement collaborated in research with 37 community groups in eastern England. Read more