Methods & Theory

All projects are innovating with new ways of contributing academic and public expertise. This theme brings together the new theories and methods being developed.
 

Community as micro-sociality and the new localism agenda

Principal Investigator: Professor Valerie Walkerdine
From 2012 to 2013

The Big Society and localism agendas bring to the fore issues of how communities might operate within a time of austerity. This project addresses current concerns by using a theoretical approach to community which understands it as relational activity, the act of communing, which is the small everyday activity which makes up what counts as community. Read more

Networked communities as dynamic co-created learning environments

Principal Investigator: Professor Neil Ravenscroft
2013

Through a series of co-created and facilitated workshops and training programmes, Phase 1 of this project has brought facilitation practice into conversation with academic research methods to create a co-designed multi-method model for organising the generation of data about personal and community histories and associations. Read more

Creative practice as mutual recovery: connecting communities for mental health and well-being

Principal Investigator: Professor Paul Crawford (University of Nottingham)
From 2013 to 2017

When considering the attributes that modern-day healthcare is frequently accused of lacking, it is all too easy to overlook one of the most precious of all: humanity. The nascent discipline of health humanities aims to address this critical shortcoming. Read more

Our Data Ourselves

Principal Investigator: Tobias Blanke
From 2013 to 2015

Our AHRC funded research project: ‘Our Data Ourselves’, will increase our understanding of the nature and role of the data that young people produce when they use social platforms and applications on their smartphones. We have paired with members of Young Rewired State. Read more

ACCORD – Archaeology Community Co-Production of Research Data

Principal Investigator: Dr Stuart Jeffrey, Glasgow School of Art
From 2013 to 2015

The ACCORD project seeks to examine the opportunities and implications of digital visualisation technologies for community engagement and research through the co-creation of 3D models of heritage places. Despite their increasing accessibility, techniques such as laser scanning, 3D modelling and 3D printing have remained in the domain of heritage specialists. Read more

Performing Abergavenny: creating a connected community beyond divisions of class, locality and history

Principal Investigator: Prof Valerie Walkerdine, Cardiff University
From 2013 to 2014

This project built upon Walkerdine et al’s research in Abergavenny for the Connected Communities Programme, ‘Community as micro-sociality’ (2012-13) which discovered that Abergavenny as a community is geographically disconnected along north/south fault lines, historically related to class and dislocation, and Mackey et al’s project ‘Challenging concepts of ‘liquid’ place through performance practices in community contexts’ (2011-14). Read more

Exploring personal communities: A review of volunteering processes

Principal Investigator: Professor Mihaela Kelemen, Keele University
2012

Exploring Personal Communities: A Review of Volunteering Processes investigates the idea that personal communities contribute to the public good by offering ways to transcend commonplace dualisms such as public/private and individual/collective. Read more

Localism, Narrative & Myth

Principal Investigator: Antonia Layard (then University of Cardiff, then University of Birmingham)
From 2012 to 2013

Localism, Narrative & Myth was a research project funded by the Connected Communities programme of the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) in 2012-2013. The academic partners were Antonia Layard (now Bristol), Raksha Pande (Durham), Joe Painter (Durham), Hilary Ramsden (then UWE) and Hamish Fyfe (Glamorgan). The project consisted of two strands both of which are available on this website. Read more

Múin Béarla do na Leanbháin (Teach the Children English): Migration as a Prism for Viewing Ethnolinguistic Vitality in Northern Ireland

Principal Investigator: Professor Karen P. Corrigan
From 2014 to 2015

Research on language in Northern Ireland (NI) focuses on the varieties spoken by the major ethnicities. Their linguistic heritageshave been hotly disputed and scholarship reflects the socio-political conflict of ‘The Troubles’. The Peace Process has ensured greater protection for Irish and Ulster Scots and has also made NI more attractive, resulting in unprecedented immigration. Read more

Cultural Planning for Sustainable Communities

Principal Investigator: Graeme Evans
From 2013 to 2014

This 18 month research project aims to use cultural mapping and planning as a way to explain and value the relationship between arts & culture and the environment. Ideas of and behaviour towards the natural environment and ‘ecosystems’ tend to lack a cultural dimension, or include the cultural sector of arts organisations, artists and other ‘hidden’ community culture. Read more