Methods & Theory

All projects are innovating with new ways of contributing academic and public expertise. This theme brings together the new theories and methods being developed.
 

The Poetics of the Archive: creative and community engagement with the Bloodaxe Archives

Principal Investigator: Professor Linda Anderson Newcastle University
From 2013 to 2015

The archive of Bloodaxe Books, newly acquired by Newcastle University, is one of the most extensive and significant poetry archives in the world. The challenge is to unlock its meaning and use by seeing it as more than a scholarly resource, accessible through standard search-based catalogue, and to allow more creative, open-ended and playful interactions with it. Read more

And the Doctor said…

Principal Investigator: Mark Webster (Staffordshire University)
From 2012 to 2014

‘And the Doctor Said….’ uses creative writing as a method for exploring people’s experiences of healthcare in north Staffordshire. People took part in workshops at community venues, which were led by writers, playwrights and storytellers. Participants shared stories, reflected upon, and wrote about their healthcare experiences. Read more

How should decisions about heritage be made?: Co-designing a research project

Principal Investigator: Dr Helen Graham, University of Leeds
2014

‘How should decisions about heritage be made?’ is an unusual research project because, when we started, we didn’t exactly know what it was about! This is because a team of people from lots of different types of organisations, groups and communities worked together in early 2013 to work together to design the research questions and its methods. Read more

In conversation with…:co-designing with more-than-human communities

Principal Investigator: Dr Michelle Bastian; University of Edinburgh
From 2013 to 2014

The aim of this project is to explore how an expanded account of community – one which recognises the active participation of non-humans – might contribute to our understandings of how research can be co-designed and co-produced. Read more

Bridging the Gap between Academic Theory and Community Relevance: Fresh Insights from American Pragmatism

Principal Investigator: Professor Mihaela Kelemen, Keele University
From 2013 to 2014

‘Bridging the Gap’ focuses on what is considered ‘actionable’ knowledge by communities and what makes knowledge relevant, useful and/or practical at their end. The four AHRC projects involved in this collaborative grant application share the view that academic theories are not ends in themselves; rather that they must serve the needs of the communities studied. Read more

Memories of ‘Mr Seel’s Garden’: Engaging with historic and future food systems in Liverpool

Principal Investigator: Dr Michelle Bastian
From 2012 to 2013

On the outer edges of Liverpool ONE, a 42 acre regeneration area of the city centre, there is a Tesco Superstore. Read more

Stories to connect with: disadvantaged children creating phygital community objects to share their life-narratives of resilience and transformation

Principal Investigator: Dr Candice Satchwell
From 2015 to 2017

Working with children and young people from Barnardo’s and other participatory groups, we will gather stories about young people’s lives which might otherwise not be heard. First we will train young people to become researchers, and they will ‘collect’ narratives from other young people. Then we will work with well-known children’s authors to make these stories into assemblages of fiction. Read more

Exploring personal communities: A review of volunteering processes

Principal Investigator: Professor Mihaela Kelemen, Keele University
2012

Exploring Personal Communities: A Review of Volunteering Processes investigates the idea that personal communities contribute to the public good by offering ways to transcend commonplace dualisms such as public/private and individual/collective. Read more

Localism, Narrative & Myth

Principal Investigator: Antonia Layard (then University of Cardiff, then University of Birmingham)
From 2012 to 2013

Localism, Narrative & Myth was a research project funded by the Connected Communities programme of the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) in 2012-2013. The academic partners were Antonia Layard (now Bristol), Raksha Pande (Durham), Joe Painter (Durham), Hilary Ramsden (then UWE) and Hamish Fyfe (Glamorgan). The project consisted of two strands both of which are available on this website. Read more

Múin Béarla do na Leanbháin (Teach the Children English): Migration as a Prism for Viewing Ethnolinguistic Vitality in Northern Ireland

Principal Investigator: Professor Karen P. Corrigan
From 2014 to 2015

Research on language in Northern Ireland (NI) focuses on the varieties spoken by the major ethnicities. Their linguistic heritageshave been hotly disputed and scholarship reflects the socio-political conflict of ‘The Troubles’. The Peace Process has ensured greater protection for Irish and Ulster Scots and has also made NI more attractive, resulting in unprecedented immigration. Read more